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11/7/2017 - Repair Work to Begin on Bizz Johnson Trail Flood Damage - Click here to print this information

Construction crews will begin work Wednesday, Nov. 8, repairing flood damage on a seven-mile section of the Bizz Johnson National Recreation Trail east of Susanville.

Access through the construction sites will be closed during working hours, Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., but open during weekends and non-working hours.

The Federal Highways Administration is funding and managing the $400,000 project.

Site Works Solutions of Redding will complete the work.

Officials at the Bureau of Land Management expect project completion in mid-December.

The Bizz Johnson Trail is a great place for families to connect with nature, and this repair project will make outings more enjoyable, said Stan Bales, outdoor recreation planner, BLM Eagle Lake Field Office. We are pleased to be a good neighbor by keeping the trail safe and enjoyable for all.

Crews will be working on nine sites between Susanville and the Devils Corral Trailhead, including an area near Cheney Creek where flooding washed away most of the trail.

Trail users can bypass the construction areas by using the South Side Trail that parallels the Bizz Johnson Trail for seven miles on the south side of the Susan River, Bales said. The single-track trail is narrow, steep and winding. We advise bike riders to walk through any sections where they feel uncomfortable.

Visitors will be able to access the South Side Trail from the Devils Corral Trailhead on the west, the Hobo Camp area on the east and from two connector trails along the Bizz Johnson Trail, depending on where project work is occurring.

The BLM will post closure and detour signs.

The Bizz Johnson Trail follows the route of the historic Fernley and Lassen Rail Line, built in 1914 to serve the booming lumber community of Westwood.

Southern Pacific Railroad abandoned the line in the late 1970s and the BLM led efforts to convert the rail line into a recreation trail.


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